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"The W. Va. is shown as she was photographed at a dry dock in Pearl Harbor. The battleship was severely damaged in the Japanese raid Dec. 7, 1941. Damages to her sides are visible."
U.S.S. West Virginia in dry dock, likely in Newport News, Va. during construction.  The keel was laid down in April 1920, and the ship was launched in November 1921.
U.S.S. West Virginia (BB-48) anchored in an unidentified location.
"The guns of U.S.S. West Virginia (BB-48) in operation.  L.C.M.'s in foreground."  L.C.M. stands for Landing Craft Mechanized.
Bell of the U.S.S. West Virginia before installation on the campus of West Virginia University.  The bell was dedicated on December 7, 1967, and joined the mast of the U.S.S. West Virginia in Memorial Plaza.
The installation of U.S.S. West Virginia's mast nears completion at Memorial Plaza on the campus of West Virginia University.  The Mountainlair and Stewart Hall are visible in the background.
L to R: Jack Miller, Frank Kosa, Clifford Olds.Olds and 2 other crew members , Ronald Endicott and Louis Costin were trapped in a sealed compartment in the West Virginia's bow after it sank on December 7th.  Any rescue attempt meant certain death. The 3 stayed alive until December 24th according to a marked calendar found with their bodies which were recovered after the ship was raised from the harbor bottom in May, 1942.
Captain Bennion was killed during the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. As  he laid mortally wounded on the West Virginia's command bridge, Bennion refused to be removed from his burning ship. He continued to give orders, directing his crew's actions. Bennion's last order to his men before he died was to leave him and "abandon ship." Captain Bennion was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.
Fern Evan's husband, GM3e Woodrow W. Evans was killed aboard the U.S.S. West Virginia during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, leaving Fern to support herself and their 20 month old son.  Subsequently, Mrs. Evans was employed at a West Coast aircraft plant.  She's shown here working on a radio bracket for a bomber.
Smoke billows from the U.S.S. West Virginia, which is pictured in the back and center of the photograph. The ship eventually sank.Floating on the left is the U.S.S. Maryland. On the right is a capsized U.S.S. Oklahoma.
Smoke rises from the sinking battleship, which was hit by seven torpedoes and two bombs.